manuscriptjourneys:

ancientart: The Codex Zouche-Nuttall, pre-Columbian piece of Mixtec writing, currently located at the British Museum, London. Late Postclassic period, from Mexico. It is one of three codices that record the genealogies, alliances and conquests of several ancientart: The Codex Zouche-Nuttall, pre-Columbian piece of Mixtec writing, currently located at the British Museum, London. Late Postclassic period, from Mexico. It is one of three codices that record the genealogies, alliances and conquests of several 11th- and 12th-century rulers of a small Mixtec city-state in highland Oaxaca, the Tilantongo kingdom, especially under the leadership of the warrior Lord Eight Deer Jaguar Claw (who died early twelfth century at the age of fifty-two). Artifact statement from the the British Museum: This is one of a small number of known Mexican codices (screenfold manuscript books) dating to pre-Hispanic times. It is made of deer skin and comprises 47 leaves. The Codex contains two narratives: one side of the document relates the history of important centres in the Mixtec region, while the other, starting at the opposite end, records the genealogy, marriages and political and military feats of the Mixtec ruler, Eight Deer Jaguar-Claw. This ruler is depicted at top centre, next to his calendric name (8 circles and a deer’s head). Very few Mesoamerican pictorial documents have survived destruction and it is not clear how the Codex Zouche-Nuttall reached Europe. In 1859 it turned up in a Dominican monastery in Florence. Years later, Sir Robert Curzon, 14th Baron Zouche (1810-73), loaned it to The British Museum. His books and manuscripts were inherited by his sister, who donated the Codex to the Museum in 1917. The Codex was first published by Zelia Nuttall in 1902. Photo credits: Michel wal, dallaschildblog Here’s the page on the British Museum site for this work. Both sources omit that the reason so few Indigenous works of art from this region survive, including Illuminated Manuscripts like this one, is that Indigenous books, building, entire libraries, and religious items were purposely burned by the Spanish to destroy as much of their culture as possible: The Spanish attempted to wipe out as much Aztec culture as they could. Aztec religion, arts, and sciences were destroyed. Almost all of their codices, sculpture, and other records were burned or smashed. Most of Tenochtitlan was razed. The first building the conquistadors destroyed was the Aztec Templo Mayor. Using its stones, the conquered Aztec were forced to build a Roman Catholic cathedral on the site of the temple. The conquistadors forced Aztec slave labour to build a new Spanish city on the site of Tenochtitlan: Mexico City. They gradually filled in and built over all of the lakes that had provided the Aztec with food, water, and protection. Before I started this blog, I didn’t know that any of the codices had survived. Most people don’t know they ever existed. by medievalpoc http://flic.kr/p/nkuA1j

Реклама

Об авторе Tiffani Leon

https://tiffanileon.wordpress.com/about
Изображение | Запись опубликована в рубрике #дневничОк. Добавьте в закладки постоянную ссылку.

Добавить комментарий

Заполните поля или щелкните по значку, чтобы оставить свой комментарий:

Логотип WordPress.com

Для комментария используется ваша учётная запись WordPress.com. Выход / Изменить )

Фотография Twitter

Для комментария используется ваша учётная запись Twitter. Выход / Изменить )

Фотография Facebook

Для комментария используется ваша учётная запись Facebook. Выход / Изменить )

Google+ photo

Для комментария используется ваша учётная запись Google+. Выход / Изменить )

Connecting to %s